Why We’re Not Emergent (By Two Guys Who Should Be) – Book Review

This is a quick book review of Why We’re Not Emergent (By Two Guys Who Should Be). Click here to purchase on Amazon.

EMERGENT
Purchase

There has been and continues to be a movement emerging (thus the moniker “emergents”) from traditional evangelicalism for several decades now. This group, mostly comprised of youngish Christians has been referred to and often refers to itself as emerging or emergent. Co-authors Kevin DeYoung and Ted Kluck address this phenomenon of the emerging church movement in the book Why We’re Not Emergent (By Two Guys Who Should Be).

DeYoung has become one of my favorite authors and bloggers over the years. I was first introduced to his writings through this book. As you can see from the title, the book relies heavily on wit and humor making the depth of academia easier to digest for the non-bookish types. DeYoung and Kluck write from a Reformed Church paradigm which means that I don’t always see eye to eye with them theologically. Nonetheless, their perspective is rooted in a love for the Bible. We share a mutual desire to stay rooted in absolutes and avoid the squishy gray areas that typify the emergent movement. For example, DeYoung has written a tremendous book on the biblical view regarding homosexuality and the defense of traditional marriage (I highly recommend that you read What Does The Bible Really Teach About Homosexuality), a stance the emergent movement finds outlandish.

The Layout of the book is unique, conversational, and consistently interesting. DeYoung and Kluck alternate chapters and carry on separate conversations that dovetail into one another intentionally. DeYoung, who is a pastor and a brilliant theologian writes from that perspective. Kluck, is a sports writer who approaches this topic from the perspective of a thoughtful church member. They are both fairly young, slightly hip (in a geeky way), smart, intellectual, engaged in culture, and Christian; all typical attributes of budding emergents (thus the title …By Two Guys Who Should Be). Yet, they are decidedly devoted to biblical truth, and although they value relevance, they sincerely believe that the Gospel is indeed the height of relevance. They hold to biblical moorings to underpin their values system in an increasingly post-modern and post-Christian world. In a nutshell, the emergent movement is the embodiment of a Christian culture leaving it’s biblical roots.

I realize that some people are still struggling to identify and understand the emergent movement because it’s not a denomination with any single leader. Some people don’t care to understand it but they should. Realize it or not, we have all likely been impacted by a friend, family member, or church leader who has drifted into this dangerous dogma to some degree or another. By its own definition, the emergent movement defies definition; their only real absolute is that there are no absolutes. Let me quote a lengthy portion of DeYoungs introduction where he struggles to accurately define the emergent movement:

“When we talk about the emerging church, we are not simply refering to what is new, postmodern, culturally with-it, or generationally up and coming. Neither are we referring solely to the officail Emergent organization. …We are talking about a movement led and inspired by a cadre of authors and pastors, who express many of the same concerns with the evangelical church, hit on many of the same themes, and often speak as the most influential voices in the emergent conversation.”

He goes on to describe the common emergent leader methodology of using self-depreciation as a form of teaching. Rather than calling their theological writings a theology or a doctrine, they call them an ongoing conversation or an evolving exploration. It makes for interesting reading filled with false humility. It also makes them impossible to pin down on the issues (because they’re always fluid). All the while, they subtly undermine the Gospel, the Bible, the Church, traditional values, and Jesus. In a further attempt to describe the emerging church DeYoung quotes Andy Crouch from Christianity Today saying emerging churches are “frequently urban, disproportionally young, overwhelmingly white, and very new.” This makes Kluck’s first chapter entitled Maybe – The New Yes especially interesting where he describes himself as a regular target of emergent evangelism. In case you’re curious, emergent evangelism usually begins as a seemingly benign conversation about how outdated traditional leaning churches and church leaders are these days.

Here’s a quick overview of the topics that DeYoung and Kluck defend: the importance and the uniqueness of Jesus, the authority and the authenticity of the Bible, the necessity of the Church, the importance of orthodoxy (right doctrine), the importance of being relative but not at the expense of orthodoxy, the importance of orthopraxy (right living as informed by right doctrine), and the ethical ramifications of creating doubt for the sake of doubt.

Although this book was written in 2008 it remains just as relevant as it was upon first release. Why We’re Not Emergent… helped me solidify my thoughts and beliefs during a turbulent time in my younger ministry. At the time, Rob Bell and his book Velvit Elvis – Repainting The Christian Faith (one of the first mainstream emergent books) was all the rage. It sent many of my peers into a tailspin. Rob Bell pastored a massive church in Michigan and was selling books by the bus load. Since then, Bell has given up his mega-church pastorate, thrown the Bible under the bus, and started consulting with Oprah (among other things). He leveraged his church leadership for secular fame and fortune. Most people influenced by his ramblings probably didn’t go that far into the woods, however, many did venture into the shady gray spaces. The intentional and unintentional consequences of emergent doctrines (or conversations as they would say) are impacting us today in large and small ways. This book is a great starting point for leaders and saints to solidify their own minds and to help them help others who are struggling with the allure of dangerous doctrines.

 

2 thoughts on “Why We’re Not Emergent (By Two Guys Who Should Be) – Book Review

Comments are closed.