Praising the Lord in All Things

We sat holding our newborn baby, watching as the doctor drew a diagram. It was a heart. He drew what it should look like. Then he drew it with the four abnormalities of the congenital defect known as tetralogy, the condition with which our first son, Ryan, was born. At first, my untrained eyes didn’t even recognize the blueness around his little eyes and lips. We found ourselves in the midst of a journey for which we were so unprepared, a long walk of faith. But in those first few moments that day with the heart specialist, our world changed forever, and I was about to join the ranks of the “hospital moms!”

As home missionaries to a western Chicago suburb, we expected sacrifices and hardships, financial and personal. But we never expected anything like this. In fact, over the next six years, Ryan underwent four complex open-heart surgeries, at three months, eighteen months, four years, and five years of age.  And, each time, the surgeon was working only millimeters from Ryan’s coronary artery. Thankfully, the Lord understands when we question our circumstances, knowing that we see “through a glass darkly.” These were undoubtedly the “desert of our days,” and our faith, like never before, would have to stand the test of fire. Like the three Hebrew children, we came to realize that faith is not merely knowing “God is able to deliver us.” We, too, prayed, “but if not,” as the operating room doors closed before us, only to find that same God standing with us in the midst of the fire.

Each was supposed to be the last, yet we came to the day we had to tell Ryan that he needed a fourth surgery. I will never forget the difficulty of explaining that to a five-year-old with vivid memories of his hospital experiences. For two years, he was the poster child for the Chicago Metropolitan Heart Association. At the news of the surgery, his blue eyes filled with tears. “What did I do wrong?” he asked. Quickly, we reassured him that he’d done nothing wrong. Nevertheless, the test of faith had come yet again. But, at age eight, when a previously inserted patch began to leak, and surgery was inevitable, the miracle came! My husband was preaching a camp on the east coast when, in the middle of the service, the Lord spoke to him that He had just healed Ryan! The doctor soon confirmed it. The leak had, indeed, sealed off—this time, God had chosen to deliver from the fire.

Our hospital journey, though, was not ended. We had now been blessed with two more sons, Jonathan, two, and six-month-old Nathan. The same week of Ryan’s miracle, Jonathan, began limping and could barely walk. The doctor, after blood work and scheduling orthopedics, reassured us – lightning rarely “strikes twice in the same place.” Still, we felt something was very wrong. His fever spiked, and he became lethargic. Then, suddenly, I had a sense of “knowing” exactly what was wrong. I shared it with my husband. With news now about the second of our sons, we received the call from our concerned family doctor, “I hate to have to tell you this, Reverend and Mrs. French.” Then, he said the very words I had spoken to my husband earlier, “Jonathan has leukemia!” We were to leave immediately for Chicago’s Children’s Memorial.

In the early morning hours, though dazed, the first miracle in this fiery trial became clear. As Jonathan was diagnosed with acute lymphatic leukemia, God had given me a word from Him. Then, the Lord said to me, “I spoke to you to assure you that I am here. I know all about it. My face is turned in your direction.” As battle-weary as we were, I desperately needed extra grace, so the Lord prepared the way, a peace beyond understanding. Nevertheless, the seemingly endless chemo, the needles, the non-sedated bone marrow aspirations, the spinals – were all incredibly difficult. But, early into treatment, I was blessed to hear Sis. Nona Freeman minister on the subject: “Praising the Lord in All Things!” God used it mightily. God was reminding me of the source of my strength amidst the trial – the power of praise!

Praise God for his mighty power! Twice God delivered Jon as he went into life-threatening septic shock, as doctors worked feverishly over him to save him. One day a newly purchased minivan suddenly appeared in our driveway, keys and all! Later, at a particularly low point, Jon could barely eat, yet the doctors allowed us to take him to his great grandfather’s funeral near St. Jude hospital. So we took him, as well, to a special service nearby for prayer. My husband’s unsaved step-father joined us and wanted to hold his grandson as they anointed him. The Lord’s touch was instantaneous, with Jon immediately asking his grandpa for something to eat! Powerfully moved, grandpa returned the next week and received the Holy Ghost!

The mountain of medical bills was miraculously wiped out, with one incredibly huge sum forgiven in total because they inexplicably lost the account! The trials left no hint of smoke, only the sweet aroma of the presence of the One Who stood with us in the midst of the fire. Both Ryan and Jon are well and active in the church we pastor in Atlanta, Ryan serving as Associate Pastor and Jon as a vital part of our youth and music ministry. To God be the glory.

The trials left no hint of smoke, only the sweet aroma of the presence of the One Who stood with us in the midst of the fire.

Rebecca French, alongside her husband, Dr. Talmadge French, has faithfully served the members of Apostolic Tabernacle in Jonesboro, Georgia, for ten years. They have been married and leading in numerous ministry capacities for forty-three years. Rebecca’s greatest joy is that her three sons, their wives, and her six grandchildren serve the Lord.

5 Mistakes Every Worship Leader Makes

All the earth shall worship thee, and shall sing unto thee; they shall sing to thy name. Selah (Psalm 66:4).

In my life, I have had the honor and opportunity to lead worship in many different settings. From Camp Meetings, Conferences, Youth Rallies, Campus Ministries, mid-week Bible Studies, and prayer meetings, to church on Sundays. I’ve seen and experienced a lot. To all my worship leader friends out there, don’t be discouraged. God is using you to make a difference in the lives of His people. We know what it feels like to miss the key change and feel foolish, give the wrong sign and be embarrassed, or sing your heart out and feel like everyone is just watching you for mere entertainment purposes. In the midst of the chaos, feelings of inadequacy, and time management, I want to remind you that what you do is Biblical, and is making a world of difference in your church and in your district.

And when he had consulted with the people, he appointed singers unto the LORD, and that should praise the beauty of holiness, as they went out before the army… (2 Chronicles 20:21).

When the armies raged against King Jehoshaphat, the Bible says he only did one thing. If you were to listen it would not sound like what you would expect it to sound like. You would not hear the sharpening of spears, the building of shields, or the wielding of swords, you would only hear appointed singers stepping out in front of an army of thousands determined to destroy them.

And when they began to sing and to praise, the LORD set ambushments against the children of Ammon, Moab, and mount Seir, which were come against Judah; and they were smitten (2 Chronicles 20:22).

Never forget the importance of your appointed music ministry. God intends to use your WORSHIP to turn the armies of the enemy against one another. God will fight our battles for us!

I would like to quickly mention five mistakes every worship leader makes. How do I know? I know because I’ve made every single one of these mistakes at some point in my music ministry. Here we go!

  1. THE PRESSURE MISTAKE

Don’t put so much pressure on yourself! It is common for a passionate and good-hearted worship leader to feel like the buck stops with them. They feel like a failure if people refuse to enter into the presence of God. Guess what? The buck doesn’t stop with you. Whatever the sword called “PRAISE” can’t cut through will be pierced by an even sharper two-edged sword, the Word of God! Don’t be so hard on yourself!

  1. THE HINDERANCE MISTAKE

…he causeth his wind to blow, and the waters flow (Psalm 147:18).

Praise, Worship, and the Word have a way of melting the hardest of hearts. When the winds of the Spirit begin to blow you have to be prayed up, and ready to flow. Let’s face it, if you’re a Pentecostal church, things probably won’t go as planned. Beware of sticking to the “Order of Service”. There are times when the Holy Ghost wants to take over, and the worship leader can determine the life or death of that service. Are you HELPING the flow or HINDERING it?

  1. THE ARROGANCE MISTAKE

Pride goeth before destruction, and an haughty spirit before a fall (Proverbs 16:18).

At some point, you had a great worship service and somebody made your day with compliments, but believe me, there’s nothing worse than an arrogant Worship Leader. Arrogance cannot lead anyone into the presence of God. Don’t make this mistake, you’ll be humbled very soon if you do… trust me.

  1. THE LONE RANGER MISTAKE

Being out front all the time can make you feel secluded and isolated. Don’t separate yourself from your praise team/musicians/choir! You need them and they need you. We’re leading people into worship TOGETHER! I have no desire to go into battle by myself, do you?

  1. THE “EVERYTHING OR NOTHING” MISTAKE

Some worship leaders like slow songs. Some like fast songs. I have often seen what I call “Everything or nothing” worship leaders. These types of Worship Leaders think if every song isn’t a shout down, red-faced, stomp the devil, worship service that they didn’t actually have church that day. Some are reversed and feel every service should be a Kari Jobe, cry your eyes out, fall on your face worship session. ALL these things are necessary, but let us not forget human nature and moderation. If God wants the Worship service to go a certain way, get out of the way, and let God have His way. Plan for everything, but just because EVERYTHING didn’t happen, doesn’t mean NOTHING happened. God works in many ways on the hearts of His people through WORSHIP.

What would you add to this list?

NATHAN 1
Nathan French

This guest article was contributed by my brother Nathan French who serves as music minister and youth pastor at Apostolic Tabernacle on the south side of Atlanta. His ministry is dynamic and in constant demand. Check out Nathan’s other other articles Do You Believe Your Youth Group Will Stay In The Church? and 7 Ways To Help Your Youth Group Backslide.

 

 

 

 

 

 

6 Descriptors of Genuine Worship

Worship is an attitude of the heart. A person can go through the outward motions of praise and not be worshiping. God knows our hearts, and He desires and deserves sincere, heartfelt praise & worship (check out my previous article outlining the difference between praise & worship). The following is a list of six descriptors of genuine heartfelt worship.

Genuine worship is vertical (Psalm 95:1). It is always directed upwards to God; never horizontally towards man. It’s important for a genuine worshipper to carefully make the distinction between being ushered into praise via talent and worshipping talent (musical or otherwise) rather than the Creator.  Genuine worship is not about personal preferences, entertainment, emotionalism, or sensationalism alone (although there are times when one or more of those elements may be involved); rather it is about total surrender to God.

Genuine worship is joyful (Psalm 95:2). On numerous occasions, God commands us via Scripture that we must worship joyfully. In reality, worship erupts from a heart that is full of the joy of the Lord. Godly joy is not predicated upon our conditions, our surroundings, or even our circumstances. That’s why Paul and Silas could worship and sing praises to God while confined unjustly in prison (Acts 16:25).

Genuine worship is participatory (Psalm 95:2). God calls us to worship Him, not to watch someone else worship Him. It is not until we truly participate that we become woven into the tapestry of godly worship. When we participate we bless God and He blesses us in return.

Genuine worship is thankful (Psalm 95:2). It is not possible to really worship with a heart filled with ingratitude.

Genuine worship is humble (Psalm 95:3). Humility is the opposite of pride. Pride is a praise killer. Pride renders a heart incapable of sincerity. Pride breeds sins of all types. Pride squeezes worship out of the hearts of men and women. Pride kept Michal in the tower (2 Samuel 6:16) but humility caused King David to worship anyway (2 Samuel 6:14).

Genuine worship is reverent (Psalm 95:4-5). God is the sovereign Lord of all the earth, the King of glory; the Rock of our Salvation. We should not suppress our joy in our expressions of reverence. Neither should we compromise our reverence in our expressions of joy.

Is Technology Hurting Our Worship?

I like technology. I’m not an anti-tech kinda guy. In fact, if I err, I err on the side of too much tech. In many ways, technology has changed our lives for the better. I mean, does anyone really want to live in a world without Angry Birds? And on a less humorous note, paperless billing has certainly made my world a lot less stressful. Technology is an instrument that can be harnessed for the good or for the bad.

More than a few church growth experts have detailed the fact that from the 70’s to the mid 90’s churches remained largely unchanged in terms of technology. Interestingly, in roughly the last two decades churches have made changes and made them drastically and rapidly. Screens are now normative, along with mood lighting, and a host of other changes as well. Musical styles have shifted and diversified, church branding is a mainstream concept, and churches are finally utilizing the benefits of free social media options. For the most part, I’m on board with these things (although I’d love to hear the old hymns a little more often).

But there is a growing concern that has been plaguing my mind for a good while now. Are we substituting genuine worship with atmosphere? For years when this question popped into my head, I pushed it back. Surely, the flashing song lyrics augmented by the motion loop background makes understanding the lyrics much easier thereby creating the optimal worship experience. Right? And then one night the church where I am privileged to serve (Apostolic Tabernacle) experienced the unthinkable. Our computers all malfunctioned at once and we were forced to do church without the support of our usual high-tech accents. We entered the service with high levels of anxiety, but something amazing happened that night; we experienced one of the most dynamic worship services of the year (on a midweek Bible Study too).

Now, is my little story conclusive proof that technology is hindering our worship services? No. However, if you begin to pay attention, and keep an open mind, I think that you will gradually notice that in many cases we are moving away from genuine worship. I fear that we often settle for well-crafted and finely tuned atmospheres over genuine moves of God.

Is my goal to see technology removed from our worship services? Certainly not. I am simply suggesting that we begin a process of self-evaluation. We can get so caught up in the graphics, the presentations, the motions, the colors, the branding, the flow, the timing, the relevance, the aesthetics, and the perfectly timed video clips that we forget to allow room for spiritual things.

Here’s a few questions that we should all consider from time to time:

  1. Are we spending more time on the physical atmosphere than we are in prayer and study?
  2. Are we emphasizing the image of a physical space more that we are seeking a move of the Holy Ghost?
  3. Are we promoting style over substance?
  4. Would we prefer our spiritual leaders to be trendy or anointed?